LLAMA REGISTRATION
Frequently Asked Questions


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    LLAMA REGISTRATION

  1. How do I register a llama with the ILR that is currently registered with another registry?
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    1. Submit a signed and dated copy of the llama's current registration certificate to the ILR. The complete genealogy will be entered in our records at registration.

    2. Include current microchip number.

    3. Submit a DNA profile or include a DNA sample – either an FTA cardor a rootball sample for storage. (DNA testing is only required of breeding animals).

    4. Submit the appropriate fee. Members save $5 per registration, among other benefits, so you might want to obtain a membership.


  2. How do I register a llama with the ILR that is not currently registered?
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    1. Complete a registration application either online or download an application.
       
    2. Include the microchip number.
       
    3. Submit a DNA profile or include a DNA sample – either an FTA card or a rootball samplefor testing or storage. (DNA testing is only required of breeding animals).
       
    4. Have your veterinarian complete the “ILR Checklist for the Physical Examination of LLAMAS.”
       
    5. Submit the appropriate fee. Members save $5 per registration, among other benefits, so you might want to obtain a membership.
       

  3. What is a non-breeder?
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  4. A “non-breeder” is a llama who is physically able to breed but has been designated as a “non-breeder” by a previous owner. The “non-breeder” designation prevents any subsequent owners from registering cria from that llama.

  5. Under what circumstances would I designate a llama as a “non-breeder?”
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  6. In some cases, the buyer has no intention of getting into breeding llamas and so the llama is sold for a lower price than if the llama was intended for breeding purposes. However, sometime later, the new owner changes his mind and breeds that llama. If the llama was designated as a “non-breeder” by the previous owner, the new owner will be unable to register that cria with the ILR as long as the llama is designated as a “non-breeder.” To change the designation, the new owner would have to go back to the owner who originally designated the llama as a “non-breeder” and request that owner to remove the “non-breeder” designation. If the two parties can come to an agreement and the former owner removes the designation, the cria can be registered. If the two can not agree and the designation remains, the cria can not be registered. 
     

  7. Why does the ILR not require DNA parent verification on all registrations?
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  8. Not requiring all cria to be parent verified by DNA before they can be registered is a policy that recognizes that not all llama breeders have the same interests and saves llama breeders a significant amount of money by not requiring parent verification for llamas whose buyers are not concerned about lineages. Those buyers who are concerned about parent verification by DNA can request it of the breeder. In most cases, the breeder is more than willing to provide the necessary testing. This flexible approach saves llama breeders the unnecessary expense of providing parent verification for buyers who don’t really care about the genealogy. 
     
    At the same time, requesting a DNA sample for storage from each cria to be registered maximizes the chances that DNA will always be available for that llama in case it is ever needed. 
     

  9. Why does the ILR accept ET (embryo transfer) cria?
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  10. The ILR is in the business of recording breeding data for llamas. It is not in the business of market manipulation or protection. Embryo transfer and artificial insemination are tools that can be used for the good of the llama community and the ILR believes that llama breeders should be able to use all the tools available to them.
     

  11. Why does the ILR not require dam owner and/or sire owner signatures when the cria is parent verified by DNA?
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  12. The ILR is in the business of recording breeding data for llamas. It is not in the business of enforcing breeder contracts. If parentage if verified by DNA, there is no doubt that the lineage is correct so the llama should be able to be registered.
     

  13. Why would I update the photos of my llama?
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  14. Potential buyers have the ability to go on the ILR website and research the genealogy of any llama they are interested in. Posting good updated photos of your llama to the ILR website allows you to participate in this approach to marketing. These photos are also used as the photo in the photo ad section of the ILR website. In addition, the ILR ShowManager program allows interested parties to click on a show and then hover over any entry to see more information about that llama. A good photo of your llama would appear with your show entry, again providing another simple way to highlight your llama to potential buyers.
     

 

 

Updated: November 20, 2017